Lighting Research Center Celebrates 25 Years
To commemorate the milestone, LRC will present a keynote and discussion about the value of lighting, followed by a cocktail reception and dinner on March 20, 2013 in Troy, NY.
 

The Lighting Research Center (LRC), a university-based research center that investigates lighting issues and educates the next generation of lighting leaders, is celebrating its 25th anniversary with an event on March 20, 2013, in Troy, NY.

The event will include a keynote and panel discussion centered on the value of lighting, along with LRC tours and demonstrations and a cocktail reception and dinner.

“We expect this to be a landmark event for lighting,” Russ Leslie, LRC co-founder and Associate Director, said in a statement. “We have invited special individuals who have been instrumental to the history of the LRC to celebrate with us. In addition, the event will be open to the public.”

The topic for the 25th anniversary keynote and panel discussion is also the subject of a new book by LRC Director Mark Rea, written to commemorate the LRC’s 25-year milestone. Dedicated to the notion that society undervalues light, largely because we do not properly measure its benefits, “Value Metrics for Better Lighting” brings together a wide range of research to illustrate how the effective use of light can benefit society and the environment.

The LRC was established in 1988 by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and has built an international reputation as the preeminent source for objective information on lighting technologies, applications, and the human response to light. From developing innovative lighting solutions for the new Boeing 787 Dreamliner and U.S. Navy submarines, to schools, historic monuments, offices, and airports, the LRC pairs advanced scientific research with dynamic design concepts to create an ideal environment for human life.

LRC alum and staff member Patricia Rizzo, who focuses on commercial and residential lighting design, works in the area of universal and inclusive design: basically, design that can accommodate a range of ages and abilities, both physical and sensory. She says LRC’s goal, to impact practice, really does benefit society and the environment.

“Proper lighting makes a huge difference in a person’s life — regardless of age,” Rizzo explains. “The LRC has contributed significantly to residential lighting over these past 25 years, from best practices on the use of energy-efficient lighting and controls, to color changing for ambiance and communication, to sensitivity for age and eye disease, to regulation of circadian systems for older adults and those with Alzheimer’s disease.”

To read about LRC and its focus areas, visit www.lrc.rpi.edu. To get additional information about its 25th anniversary event and tickets, visit http://www.lrc.rpi.edu/25/.

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