Energy Star Recognizes Three Lighting Companies
 
GE Lighting and Appliances accepts their Energy Star Award from the EPA.
(From left) GE's Leonard Lee and Maryrose Sylvester, EPA Director Ann Bailey, and GE's Rod Barry and Joe Howley at the Energy Star Awards on March 15.

GE Lighting, Sea Gull Lighting and Good Earth Lighting were all recognized for their work in energy efficiency at the Energy Star® Awards on March 15, in Washington, D.C. at a ceremony that also celebrated Energy Star's 20th anniversary. GE Lighting received the Energy Star Award for Sustained Excellence for the seventh year in a row, while Sea Gull Lighting and Good Earth Lighting both received Energy Star Awards for Excellence.

According to Energy Star, GE Lighting offered a total of 500 Energy Star-rated lighting products in 2011 – a 29 percent increase from the year before – and also added 93 new LED products to its line. The company also educated thousands of people about Energy Star-qualified light bulbs through its mobile trade show, the GE Lighting Revolution Tour.

“We’re proud that GE Lighting has more than 500 Energy Star-qualified products which provide increased energy efficiency for our customers,” GE Lighting President and CEO Maryrose Sylvester said in a statement. “Being recognized for sustained excellence shows the value of listening to customers, and points to our ability to swiftly put innovations born in GE labs into the hands of customers.”

Sea Gull Lighting, two-time recipient of Energy Star's Partner of the Year Award and a three-time winner of the Energy Star Sustained Excellence Award, currently offers 644 Energy Star-qualified fixtures and fans. The company has also partnered with builders, architects and developers to install Energy Star-rated fixtures and fans in a variety of projects. Sea Gull Lighting President Greg Cesca says he was very pleased to be recognized.

"This year marks our broadest energy-efficient product portfolio to date: The recent expansion of our Energy Star and LED lines enables us to offer a vast range of Energy Star and energy efficient options to the builder community," says Sea Gull Lighting President Greg Cesca. "Plus, our new Energy Star-qualified fixtures and a line of nine Energy Star-qualified LED bulbs allow the conversion for 85 percent of Sea Gull Lighting’s lighting fixtures to LED.”

This is the fifth time Energy Star has recognized Good Earth Lighting, whose decorative fixture line is 100 percent Energy Star-qualified. The manufacturer also partnered with retailers like Lowe’s and Ace Hardware to promote Energy Star fixtures through local utility programs.

“We’re a company that’s very dedicated to energy efficient lighting fixgtures, and we’ve been a champion of energy efficient lighting for over 20 years,” Good Earth Lighting President Marvin Feig says. “We were one of the original participants in the Energy Star program, and have worked closely with the EPA on maintaining an Energy Star lighting fixture program with innovative technologies that is also value driven.”

To see a complete list of the Energy Star Award winners, check out the Energy Star website

  • GE Lighting and Appliances accepts their Energy Star Award from the EPA.
    GE Lighting and Appliances accepts their Energy Star Award from the EPA.
    (From left) GE's Leonard Lee and Maryrose Sylvester, EPA Director Ann Bailey, and GE's Rod Barry and Joe Howley at the Energy Star Awards on March 15.
  • Sea Gull Lighting Vice President of Sales John Sena (left) and President Greg Ce
    Sea Gull Lighting Vice President of Sales John Sena (left) and President Greg Ce
    Sea Gull Lighting Vice President of Sales John Sena (left) and President Greg Cesca (right) accept the 2012 Energy Star Award for Excellence from Energy Star's Beth Craig.

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