Covering a Junction Box With Insulation
If you've moved the location of a fixture, do you dare cover the old junction box location with cell foam insulation?
I had a dining room light moved about 3 feet from its original placement by and electrician and he kept the junction box accessible with a plate cover, as per code. I am getting ready to cell foam my attic floor and wonder now if I should have had him move the J-box to the new light location because once it's foamed, it's a done deal. Is this even possible? My pot lights will have boxes built over them before they are foamed. Should I have the J-box covered by a box as well?

Pot lights? You don’t mean grow lights for marijuana, do you? I would have a whole different answer for that question. If you mean recessed fixtures, then I would definitely have the electrician put a new junction box over the new dining room table location and remove the old junction box. It would be cleaner if he could run electrical directly from the dimmer to the new location instead of using the old junction box as a junction point. Otherwise, you can get stuck with that cover plate left in the ceiling for as long as you live in the house.

Another option is to put a recessed fixture where the original junction box is now located. The electrician could use the recessed fixture as a wire-way (feed point) to connect the new dining room light to the original switch. It would mean, though, that the recessed fixture would come on at the same time as the dining room fixture. You could also consider motorized mirror ball there. It would go great with your pot lights.

Randall Whitehead lighting designer
Randall Whitehead, IALD

Randall Whitehead, IALD, is a professional lighting designer and author. His books include "Residential Lighting, A Practical Guide." Whitehead has worked on projects worldwide, appeared on the Discovery Channel, HGTV and CNN, and he is regular guest on Martha Stewart Living Radio. Visit his website for more information on books, upcoming seminars and the latest lighting trends.

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